Tips For Improving Your Lighting When Studying From Home

Tips For Improving Your Lighting When Studying From Home

The following contribution is from another author.

Some students like to study at home, others prefer heading to the open air or a part of their university to do so. Unfortunately, for those in the latter category, coronavirus has stopped that from happening. As we’re working from home more and more these days, there are several things we have to look out for in order to work well.

For one thing, having the right desk and chair is important. You don’t want to end up with a repetitive strain injury. However, lighting is also of great importance. It can set a mood like nothing else, and it helps us get comfortable and in the zone.

For any essay writer who was given the task to craft multiple essays at a time, getting the lighting right is vital in terms of being able to read books, notes, and texts. 

When I start to write my essay, the lighting is essential. It can make me feel focused on the task. In my mind’s eye, I can see my desk and my adjustable lamp shining down onto the workspace. This aesthetic moment creates a sense of calm and helps to get tuned.

Natural or artificial?

If we’re looking for the best light, then natural light comes first on the list. It should preferably come through a big window that looks out onto some sort of verdant landscape. However, most of us live in cities, so this isn’t a sure bet. 

Artificial light comes in many different styles. We can divide them into high and low color temperatures. Low temperatures are like sunsets, and high temperatures are like daylight or brighter. 

A study published in Nature found that indoor lighting that uses too high of a color temperature can affect our melatonin and glutamate levels. That is to say, it breaks up our natural cycle. However, this daylight is not bad for us as it keeps us alert and active. But when we have to turn on the lights to keep studying, it’s best for us to choose a bulb that is on the low end of the color-heat spectrum. With that in mind, when choosing a study spot, choose a place that will facilitate light in the daytime.

Opt for a proper lamp

Lamps create a special ambiance, whether they’re in the study, the living room, or the bedroom. A good lamp takes down the tone of a room, and makes it more livable and cozy. As such, students should invest in a lamp. Now, that might sound like a strange investment – lamps are cheap and freely available. But what students are really doing when they spend some money on lighting is saying to themselves that they’ll create a proper coziness in the room.

When it comes to lamps, there are a variety of styles. The classic lamp that everyone aspires to own is an Anglepoise, which is the one that features in the Pixar logo. That lamp is expensive when bought new, and even expensive when bought second hand depending on the model. But they’re built to last and look fantastic in any home study.

Aside from dropping money on a lamp, our earlier idea about light temperature is a good starting point. Find a lamp you like, and then find a bulb that can accommodate your preferred light settings.

One solid choice is a smart bulb. These are bulbs that are able to change the color, hue, brightness via remote control. This remote control can be a separate device, or it could be on your smartphone. Not only does this idea save money compared with buying an expensive lamp, but it can be beneficial throughout your day. Some bulbs will turn on like a light-based alarm clock. Others will be good for parties.

Hopefully, this article has presented some lighting solutions for you. The major decisions are to be made around light temperatures. Get the right source of illumination at the right time of day in order to boost productivity. Warm temperatures should be used in the evening to avoid messing with our internal body clock – although this approach could be altered in order to stay up late and do some intense studying. 

Author

Eric is the creator of At Home in the Future and has been a passionate fan of the future since he was seven. He's a web developer by trade, and serves as the Director of Communication and Technology for a large church in Nashville, TN (where he and his family are building a high tech home in the woods).

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